News

 

View this post on Instagram

⭐️The thoracic spine is known as the ‘Cinderella’ region. ⭐️ The range of movement within the thoracic spine is important for sports performance, particularly overhead / upper limb movements. Reduced thoracic spine mobility has been shown to increase the risk of injury in the upper limb. Prolonged sitting and poor sitting posture are thought to contribute to thoracic stiffness and this in turn has been linked to neck pain and stiffness.    Focused thoracic mobility work can be really worthwhile to improve sports performance and kinematics (how our whole body moves).   ✅tag someone you think would benefit from these.  ✅Like and save to try yourself.  https://bmjopensem.bmj.com/content/6/1/e000713
 #sportsrehab #sportmedicine #physiolondon #softtissuetherapy #healthylifestyle #core #fitness #workout #gym #strength #fit #training #pilates #motivation #coreworkout #fitnessmotivation #personaltrainer #exercise #health #homeworkout #fitfam #corestrength #strong #balance #functionaltraining #lifestyle #gymlife

A post shared by REHAB360 (@rehab360_abi) on

 

View this post on Instagram

So this weekend I went for an epic walk with some friends. We walked a foot blistering 26.2 miles. It was to raise money for a young women who needs an expensive US treatment for an aggressive cancer. www.gofundme.com/f/up-amp-down-the-uk-and-back-in-12-hours It got me thinking about the health benefits of walking. Walking regularly significantly reduces cardiovascular risk factors as well as improves physical functioning and mental health. It has been shown to improves blood pressure and heart rate. As well as lower body fat, body mass index, and total cholesterol. It improve aerobic capacity and improves physical function. Walking regularly has also been shown to lower the risk of developing depression.  This time of Covid has got us all trying to keep our train and bus rides to a minimum. It's the perfect time to start to increase the amount we walk. What's more let's invite some friends for some walking and talking. If walking was a pill we would all be taking it. So what are you waiting for.. #walking #rambler #marathonwalk #londonwalks Hanson & Jones (2015) https://doi-org.stmarys.idm.oclc.org/10.1136/bmj.h330

A post shared by REHAB360 (@rehab360_abi) on

View this post on Instagram

Often at running events, I observe runners diligently stretching before the starting whistle. Although this is a well-established tradition is it actually beneficial? Research has established that elite runners are LESS flexible than recreational runners. Tight muscles are useful when it comes to running economy (how efficient your muscles are working) and running performance. In fact, static stretching before an event can be detrimental to both performance and economy. Another common belief is stretching helps to prevent injury. However, the research suggests this is not the case. Most injuries occur when tissue is 'overloaded' and can not keep up with the demands asked of it. As stretching does not build greater muscle capacity it is unlikely to help with overload injuries. That being said …. Being 'too' stiff in the ankles and hips particularly can lead to compensatory movements and increased load on certain structures potentially leading to injury. In this case, targeted stretching can be helpful. So am I saying stretching is always bad …??? NO, not at all. If you've been running for 20 years and love a good calf stretch before you set off far be it from me to say stop! But think about what you do and when… Dynamic stretches tailored to your body's needs and combined with a heart-pumping warm-up can be a great way to start a run. Although pre-event static stretching is not recommended. Allotting time during the week to work on mobility can be useful in increasing the range of movement. So what’s a good alternative to stretching? well, stay tuned to my feed I'll be posting my favourites very soon… Baxter et al (2016)Impact of stretching on the performance and injury risk of long-distance runners #runlondon #running #runninginjury #stretching #physio #sportsrehab #softtissuetherapy

A post shared by REHAB360 (@rehab360_abi) on

 

View this post on Instagram

Our bodies are always looking out for us, but sometimes they can be a little over  protective. When we are injured our nervous system will contract muscles around the area to limit movement (known as muscle guarding). This can be helpful initially, but then it can start to cause issues. Mobilising the lower back in all planes of movement can help to reduce muscle guarding and perceived pain. It also helps to gradually exposes us to movements that we maybe avoiding due to an expectation of pain. Here are my go-to lower back mobilising exercises. Try then out and let me know what you think?  #backpain #stretching #mobilisation #healthylifestyle #fitness #london #fitinspo #physiotherapy #physiorehab #sportrehab #pilates #hackneywick #stratford

A post shared by REHAB360 (@rehab360_abi) on

View this post on Instagram

80% of people will experience back pain at some point in their lives. Non-specific lower back pain  is where there is not a specific pathological condition causing the pain. It is a condition that takes both and physical and mental toll. The internet is full of easy fixes that rarely live up to expectations. Everybody is different and your experience is unique.  That being said… Here are three principals from the literature that have been shown to  play an important role in recovery.   1. STAY ACTIVE – research clearly shows those people that stay active recover quicker. So, find an activity (walking/swimming/ pilates) and continue to move as tolerated. 2. STAY CONNECTED – back pain can be very isolating. You miss social events because you're in pain. Because of how the body is affected by mood this can increase symptoms. Try inviting friends to your place, or set up a zoom call.  3. STAY ENGAGED – recovery is a process you need to engage in. There is, unfortunately, no magic pill. You have the power to make yourself better, through consistent engagement in rehab.   Lin et al 2019  NICE guidelines 2018  #backpain #sportsrehab #lowerbackpain #physicaltherapy #physiotherapy #softtissuetherapy #pilates

A post shared by REHAB360 (@rehab360_abi) on

View this post on Instagram

This morning I swam in the @londonroyaldocks. During this heatwave, it was a real relief to submerge into water and cool off. When I got out, my mind and body felt rejuvenated…  Coldwater immersion is a popular recovery strategy for combating delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). But how does it work?? The drop-in tissue temperature alters the function of the nerves within the muscles which reduces muscle spasms and provokes a pain-relieving effect. The compressive force of the water around your limbs can help to reduce inflammation and swelling much like a compressive bandage. But… is this always a good thing??? not necessary… precisely because of the anti-inflammatory effect it can reduce muscle adaption (strength gains). So what does this mean? If you've done a sports event and are suffering from bad DOMS then cold water immersion can help relieve pain and get you back in your feet quicker. If you regularly train and you have specific goals around strength gains this treatment interrupts your body's natural adaptation.  Swimming in cold water regularly also boosts your immunity! Researchers believe that the stress-shock response induced by cold water helps your body build immunity to combat colds & flu. Even better, the fact your body has to work hard to swim in cold water means you get fitter and better at combating illnesses. So everyone’s a winner (apart from viruses)!  #londonroyaldocks #londonswimming #DOMS #restday #immunityboost #sportrehab #Physio #coldwaterswimming #cryotherapy   Tipton et al (2017) cold water immersion kill or cure.  https://doi.org/10.1113/EP086283

A post shared by REHAB360 (@rehab360_abi) on

 

View this post on Instagram

A lot of people are now adjusting to working from home. A common complaint I hear about is neck pain. As we crouch over our kitchen tables working on our laptops our heads are in a forward and downward position for extended periods. Our heads are heavy (the downside of being brainy) this loads the muscles and joints in our neck which can lead to pain.  So what can we do about it? Well, first things first… get your work station sorted! Move your computer screen so it is at eye level. Second… improve your spinal mobility. This relieves muscle tightness, helps to ensure good movement patterns and prevents excessive strain on specific spinal segments.  Third… strengthen your deep neck flexors this has been shown to reduce acute neck pain. Strengthening postural back muscle helps to support better posture and prevent future reoccurrences. Swipe to see my go-to mobilising exercises and keep an eye on our feed for more strengthen exercises this week. #sportsrehab #sportmedicine #physiolondon #softtissuetherapy #healthylifestyle ##healthyliving

A post shared by REHAB360 (@rehab360_abi) on